Matza… and other delights

Food photographer Yula Zubritsky explores the ins and outs of matza in a holiday-themed photo series.

Matza — also known as the bread of affliction — is generally not considered a sensual delight. Crunchy? Yes. Cardboard consistency? You got it. Difficult to digest? Roger that. But a delicious delicacy? Not so much.

Like it or not, matza is on the menu every Passover and so — having no other recourse — we dress it up with sweet toppings, savory spices, egg coatings and all manner of mix-ins. But on Seder night, it’s four glasses of wine and three pieces of plain matza that make up the meal which opens and closes with — you guessed it — matza.

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The topography of matza — ridges, furrows, perforations, lights and darks — is the subject of a holiday-themed series by food photographer Yula Zubritsky

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Through her lens, matza becomes a graphic element…

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And an architectural one…

Matzo, Matza , matzah,passover, jews

Here’s a novel way to hide the Afikomen — in plain sight!

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Who knew matza could be so sexy?

Zubritsky sells prints through her website and is also marketing matza-themed e-cards — in Hebrew and English — that are fitted to Facebook page cover dimensions. The perfect way to greet your virtual visitors over the holiday. May it be a happy one! 

About Rachel Neiman

A veteran media professional who has lived in Israel since 1984, Rachel has been part of the ISRAEL21c organization since 2008. Prior to that, she served as managing editor of Globes Online, the English-language edition of Israel’s leading business daily, and before that, at The Jerusalem Post, as a business reporter, feature writer, and consumer columnist. Rachel began writing about Israeli technology companies at LINK Israel’s Business and Technology Magazine and is a professional Hebrew to English translator. In her spare time, she is an active member of the Havurat Tel Aviv congregation, and the Holyland Hash House Harriers, part of an international running and drinking disorganization.