This year, Good Deeds Day comes at a particularly appropriate time – with violence and war becoming reality for millions of people, volunteering to benefit others is a sure way to spread much-needed kindness near and far.

Launched back in 2007, Good Deeds Day has grown from a local volunteering event in Israel into a globe-spanning phenomenon celebrated in more than 100 countries. Individuals and groups volunteer across various fields such as beach clean-ups and school renovations.

In Israel, Good Deeds Day is scheduled for March 29, and internationally on April 3.

Arab and Jewish schoolchildren jointly clean spaces and undertake some planting during last year’s Good Deeds Day in Israel. Photo courtesy of Ruach Tova

Israelis can sign up for volunteer activities individually or as part of a group, or simply come to one of 100 Good Deeds stations located across the country.

Activities will include, for example, computer training for the elderly, fixing kids’ bikes, organizing food packages and sprucing up neighborhoods.

This year will also see the return of the successful #FAMING campaign that encourages people to share kind and positive stories on social media in a bid to counter the online shaming phenomenon.

Children help the elderly to cultivate their gardens during last year’s Good Deeds Day in Israel. Photo courtesy of Ruach Tova

Abroad, activities will differ from country to country.

In Uganda, for example, 5,000 people are scheduled to participate in a range of activities from marching in a brass band to caring for the elderly, while Mexico is set to host a kite festival and sports activities and workshops aimed at raising environmental awareness.

In Cambodia, Good Deeds Day volunteers plan to release millions of fish symbolizing happiness and luck, and Greece is set to see a major beach clean-up.

“This day, which I initiated 16 years ago, is a peak event of doing good activities that take place all year round, and I believe that if we think good, speak good, and do good, our world will look different, every day,” said businesswoman and philanthropist Shari Arison.

“All of us together have the power to lead the world to a better place, each in their own way and according to their heart’s desire,” Arison continued.

“It is heartwarming to see the outpouring of responses from people across the globe who extend a helping hand at this time, in any way possible, either face-to-face or by ‘faming’ on social media, and in numerous other ways that do good for the benefit of others.”

Find out how you can take part here.